Project types: Conservation

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Project Description

Conservation of all Species in the Kruger National Park

The Kruger Large Mammal Research project aims to ensure the conservation of all species of wildlife in the Kruger National Park. SANParks recognises that large mammals are perhaps the most important biological assets for conservation as they drive African savannah systems and attract tourists which in turn benefits people living in these areas.

Preserving Biodiversity

The project aims to effectively manage the inevitable human-wildlife conflict and to preserve the biodiversity of the area through restoring the natural order of the ecosystems. The researchers here understand that ecosystems function best when they are unstable and are taking steps to restore natural order by removing unnatural interventions like additional water sources and fences (where it will not affect tourism) and managing mammal populations by relocating certain animals. These interventions are intended to contribute towards greater biodiversity. The research focuses on four areas: elephants, rhinos, carnivores and large herbivores.

HOW YOU CAN HELP BY SUPPORTING SATIB CONSERVATION TRUST

The SATIB Conservation Trust has provided a fully insured GWM research vehicle which will be used to support the large mammal research programme in the Kruger National Park.

We are also planning on assisting with conservation education for tourists and surrounding communities and a new human-wildlife conflict programme dealing with lion predation of cattle in community areas on the western boundary.

Get Involved

Please continue to support our efforts and help us preserve Africa’s wildlife for future generations to enjoy.

WHAT YOUR DONATION WILL MEAN:

100% of your donation will go directly to any item/project you choose. Or if you prefer, we’ll select the project for you. Either way, you can be assured that your contribution will have a positive impact on conservation in Southern Africa.

No matter how small, your donation will make a difference.

You may also be interested in

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Project Description

Scope

Elephants Alive operates in South Africa’s Kruger National Park which has recently been incorporated into the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park along with the Limpopo and Gonarezhou National Parks. Elephants Alive’s aim is to preserve the elephant populations of the area and reduce human-elephant conflict through effective interventions and educational projects.

The research team focuses on the following:

  • Tracking elephants using cutting edge technology to understand elephant’s movements.
  • Individual based elephant identification studies to understand elephant’s social landscapes
  • Vegetation surveys to understand how elephants alter their environment
  • Questionnaire surveys to understand how people perceive elephants and their effects
  • Educational programmes and presentations to spread the word about pressing elephant conservation issues.
Tracking Elephants

The work of Elephants Alive centres on satellite tracking technology, examining the impact of elephant populations on their habitats and the monitoring of individually identified animals to learn more about the social dynamics of the herds. Some of these elephants are the last remaining big tusked elephants and they have become valuable assets in educational programmes aimed at addressing issues of elephant conservation and poaching. Elephants Alive also trains volunteers from local communities to assist with research and become ambassadors for wildlife.

HOW YOU CAN HELP BY SUPPORTING SATIB CONSERVATION TRUST

The SATIB Conservation Trust has provided a fully insured Land Rover Freelander research vehicle which will be used for elephant observations throughout Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. The Trust also provides varied insurance cover for vehicles and liability insurance as well as equipment, PR support, transportation services, business advice and financial support. We are also planning on assisting with conservation education for tourists and surrounding communities and will begin investigating the establishment of a “fly camp” for research purposes and a volunteer researcher programme to assist with field work.

Get Involved

Please continue to support our efforts and help us preserve Africa’s wildlife for future generations to enjoy.

WHAT YOUR DONATION WILL MEAN:

100% of your donation will go directly to any item/project you choose. Or if you prefer, we’ll select the project for you. Either way, you can be assured that your contribution will have a positive impact on conservation in Southern Africa.

No matter how small, your donation will make a difference.

You may also be interested in

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Project Description

Research and Conservation

The African Wildlife Conservation Fund is a non-profit organisation that originally started through the efforts of a group of people dedicated to the conservation of the endangered African Wild Dog in Zimbabwe. The African Wildlife Conservation Fund’s work has since expanded to include the conservation of other large predators, community outreach, initiatives to stop illegal hunting for bush meat and helping to raise funds for a rhino anti-poaching team. The Gonarezhou Predator Project is one of these programmes and focuses on the large predators of the Gonarezhou National Park including lions, leopards, cheetahs, wild dogs and spotted hyenas. It has been discovered that the extremely low populations of predators in the park are due to an illegal trade in skins, the snaring and poisoning of large predators and the killing of predators who prey on livestock by local communities.

Anti-Poaching

The Gonarezhou Predator Project aims to conserve the predator populations of the park through assisting with anti-poaching and snare removal, empowering the authorities to deal with problem animals in non-lethal ways, educating local communities about the benefits of wildlife to reduce human-wildlife conflict and to improve relations between the park and its neighbours. The conservation efforts are monitored regularly and an increase in the lion population is an encouraging sign that they are already working effectively.

HOW YOU CAN HELP BY SUPPORTING SATIB CONSERVATION TRUST

The SATIB Conservation Trust has developed a brochure for the African Wildlife Conservation Fund to promote the work being done in Gonarezhou and to assist with sponsorship of the project’s research and education initiatives. These have been distributed locally and in the US. In 2014, we are working on providing educational content on human-wildlife conflict in pamphlets for communities adjacent to Gonarezhou National Park.

Get Involved

Please continue to support our efforts and help us preserve Africa’s wildlife for future generations to enjoy.

WHAT YOUR DONATION WILL MEAN:

100% of your donation will go directly to any item/project you choose. Or if you prefer, we’ll select the project for you. Either way, you can be assured that your contribution will have a positive impact on conservation in Southern Africa.

No matter how small, your donation will make a difference.

You may also be interested in

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Project Description

Scope

The Hwange Lion Research Project, which has been running for 15 years, is aimed at understanding, managing and conserving the lion population of Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park through the collection of valuable long-term monitoring data of population demographics, ecology and behaviour. The project is run under the auspices of the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) of Oxford University’s Department of Zoology which has grown to be one of the largest and most productive conservation research institutes in the world

Reducing human-wildlife conflict – The Long Shields Lion Guardians

As part of this valuable research, the Hwange Lion Research Project focuses on reducing human-animal conflict, which poses a significant risk to the survival of all carnivores in the wild, through a detailed understanding of the ecological and social factors that influence conflict. In the Hwange area, this conflict arises from lion predation on the livestock of rural communities who frequently retaliate by killing the lion. The Hwange Lion Research Project has implemented several strategies to alleviate lion predation. The employment and training of Long Shields Lion Guardians – local people who form a link between conservationists and their communities, providing information and encouraging cooperation – is an important initiative which has proved very successful. The Lion Guardians monitor wildlife populations and alert local herdsmen when a lion is nearby, allowing them to move livestock to safety or to frighten the lion off. Although in its early stages, the initiative has been widely accepted by local communities.

Bomas

A critical factor that is highly effective in reducing lion predation is the housing of livestock in bomas overnight. The Hwange Lion Research Project is evaluating existing bomas utilised within the communities and is now working with the communities to build and encourage use of community mobile bomas. Early trials have shown a noticeable reduction in lion predation since the introduction of the Long Shields and the boma programme.

Community education

Education is an essential element of all conservation projects as it will be the support of rural communities which determines the success of many conservation initiatives. For this reason, the Hwange Lion Research project has designed an illustrated book called Vusa the Lion Guardian for distribution to schools in the area. The comic focuses on the importance of protecting livestock and the children are able to take it home to read to their parents.

Anti-Poaching

Anti-poaching is also a priority because illegal snaring has been shown to have a significant impact on lions. The project employs anti-poaching scouts who patrol the park alongside the Parks and Wildlife Management Authority.

In addition to these measures for reducing human-animal conflict in the area, the Hwange Lion Research Project is uncovering valuable information about lion populations in the area, including data about their long-range movements between protected areas. This research underscores the importance of preserving corridors of natural habitat to allow for different populations to meet and mate – an essential element in the long-term survival of the species as a whole.

HOW YOU CAN HELP BY SUPPORTING SATIB CONSERVATION TRUST

The SATIB Conservation Trust has supported the Hwange Lion Research Project for the past five years, helping to fund the Long Shield Lion Guardians (including the donation of a GWM 4 x4 vehicle) and providing material support for the Anti-Poaching Unit. It has also assisted with an extensive educational programme, PR support and conservation information for visitors to the area. The SATIB Conservation Trust helps to provide clothing and equipment for the Lion Guardians and the Anti-Poaching team as well as insurance and transportation of equipment to the project site. In 2014 the SATIB Conservation Trust plans to provide additional mobile communal bomas for deployment into communities and further educational materials for communities. The SATIB Conservation Trust will also support the extension of the Hwange Lion Research Project to the western boundary and into Botswana.

Get Involved

Please continue to support our efforts and help us preserve Africa’s wildlife for future generations to enjoy.

WHAT YOUR DONATION WILL MEAN:

100% of your donation will go directly to any item/project you choose. Or if you prefer, we’ll select the project for you. Either way, you can be assured that your contribution will have a positive impact on conservation in Southern Africa.

No matter how small, your donation will make a difference.

You may also be interested in